Conquering Change

Dentistry, Lifestyle

Recently, I was made aware that the office I have gainfully been employed at for the past seven years was going to be sold to a larger, private-equity company. One of two owners called me to break the news about the transition, and nonchalantly tried to reassure me that not much should change about the terms of my employment other then who signs my paycheck.

I have never been one to embrace change well. I would almost go so far as to say I fear it.

I see day-to-day change take place in front of me constantly, and I struggle to accept even that. My kids getting older is a prime example. Google Photos reminds me of this day ‘7 years ago’ and I am an emotional wreck. Why do they have to grow up so freaking fast?

Listen, I know, it is a part of life and we cannot control it. Without a doubt, my best days are when I manage to block out the seemingly infinite “what if’s” scenarios that float around in my head. When I somehow silence all that noise that occupies my mental space, my days are much more peaceful and happier.

Years ago, I read a book called “Who Moved My Cheese” by (Patrick) Spencer Johnson. From what I remember, it was a quick enough read with a very simple message. Life moves on, and so should we. “The quicker you let go of old cheese, the sooner you find new cheese.” The author devotes the book to trying to embrace change in work and throughout our lives.

I have worked for enough large DSO’s (Dental Support Organization’s) to know they are not run the same as smaller, privately-owned offices. In an attempt to streamline operations and cut costs (and maximize profits), something’s gotta give – it may impact the quality of dental materials, the staff, the schedule – it could touch on every aspect of the practice.

As a mere associate, I am not privy to the terms of the sale and transition of ownership. Only time will tell what changes will come. The way I see it, at best, my office stays as-is and nothing changes. At worst – the autonomy I have enjoyed in picking out my own materials and setting my own schedule starts to disappear. What would be utterly devastating is if my beloved staff get spooked and decide to quit.

This is the second office now that has been sold out from underneath me. Because I have been just an employee, as the practice changes hands – even though I worked hard to build it up, because I have no equity stake – I reap none of the benefits of its successes throughout this sale taking place. The two original owners (not much older then I am currently) have now paved a pathway for retirement for themselves; and I am but a commodity being sold along with the chairs and other equipment.

On the flip side, I have been compensated well over the years and had I invested more wisely (thanks a lot Celsius Network), I might also in my own right have been on a path towards financial independence. Plus, over the last seven years I have not been burdened by administrative hassles of running this practice – and when the A/C fails, addressing staffing issues, dealing with payroll matters – none of that has really weighed on my shoulders.

“Change happens when the pain of holding on becomes greater than the fear of letting go.”

― Spencer Johnson, Who Moved My Cheese?

How my staff will respond to the new owners, how my pay will be affected, how my patient schedule may change – all of these are unknowns that occupy my mental bandwidth these days. Mixed in with regrets about not building up equity all these years and reaping zero ownership benefits. And do not get me started on the massive financial setback I have incurred with the atrocious investing missteps on the Celsius ordeal.

Lately though, when I am not caught in a moment of self-doubt and insecurity, I am convinced that – however horrendous these last several months may have been – I am more open to taking on the challenges of practice ownership, I am a wiser/more cautious investor, and I am, for the most part, optimistic about what the future has in store for me. I am even finding ways to enjoy my kids getting older and the fun activities I can do with them now versus seven years ago.

Hope you handle change better than I do. Every day I feel I have to convince myself there is light at the end of the tunnel. Thank you for taking the time to read my post today! Please feel free to share with me your own stories of taking on change in your life!

Anxiety and Panic Attacks

Lifestyle

Just to offer you some context, it is exactly 2:26 AM as I sit to write this post. That said, I cannot guarantee any actual coherency or substance in what follows. Writing has always offered me some degree of catharsis and, hopefully, a cure for my current bout of insomnia.

A few weeks ago, I was working in the surgery center when – mid-procedure, my heart started rapidly beating, I had a slight uncomfortable tightness in my chest, and I found I had to take a couple of deep breathes to essentially restore myself to a baseline where I felt normal again. The dentistry was going fine, nothing stress-inducing had happened and it was all very routine-Monday sort of work that I was doing.

I want to say, either the next day or the day after (shame on me for not keeping better records), a similar episode occurred while I was in the office working on a patient for dental treatment. Basically an identical presentation to what happened earlier, a brief couple of minutes where I had a slight aching in my chest, a shortness of breathe and what felt like I was getting tachycardic or having some palpations of my heart muscle – not exactly sure.

Admittedly, this has not been the best year. Most recently, certain members within my household contracted COVID; and so there were health issues amongst family to be worried about. Still a very fresh and extremely agonizing is the financial loss I incurred with my poor Celsius investment. And to pour salt on the wound, the practice I work for recently sold to a large corporate entity – leaving me with a suffocating uncertainty of whether or not to stay employed with the new group or finally take a leap (along with the many headaches and financial investment) of practice ownership.

I already do not manage stress well. My entire life I have lived very phobic of everything; social situations, new endeavors, taking on risk, basically changes of any size or shape. Just today in fact, something as simple as watching my boys play in a tennis tournament this afternoon – I can literally feel my cortisol levels spiking when the game gets close. To the point where I have to walk away, stare into the sky and observe the clouds through the trees, all the while playing calming music in my AirPods. Let me tell you, it makes for a miserable existence.

Doctor Googling the way that we do, tells me a rapid heart rate and chest tightness are commonly associated with Atrial Fibrillation (abnormality in the heart rhythm), panic disorder (panic attack), anxiety, and/or stress. Fortunately, I also saw my actual physician today; who recommended we do 1) an EKG (which I did right there and then – and thankfully, everything looked good according to him) and 2) a CT calcium score (which I plan to schedule soon). An electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) assesses the heart rate and rhythm; but could be used as a tool to diagnose a possible arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat), blocked arteries, heart damage, failure or even a heart attack. While I did not experience any dizziness or faintness, the chest pain, rapid heartbeat and breathing warranted me getting this done. Apparently, the cardiac CT calcium score (aka coronary calcium scan) will help identify the amount of calcified plaque in my coronary arteries. As he put it, the EKG might be a past indicator of heart healthiness, but this Calcium Scoring may be more of a future indicator of sorts.

Once we have (hopefully) ruled out maybe this being a physical ailment with my heart; the next item on the agenda is to address the psychological element of it. My physician (as I am sure all do) encouraged me to exercise more regularly, incorporate yoga and if need-be, try therapy. No quick Xanax fix I guess.

Throughout my life, the times I have felt my best (both physically and mentally) are always when I exercise regularly. Unfortunately, it is easy to fall into a rut and lose momentum. I really am going to make it a priority now to squeeze in 3 or 4 days a week of a solid exercise regimen, and maybe – just maybe – I can get these panic attacks (?) to subside or disappear altogether.

The boys after their USTA Junior Circuit Tournament

Every post I write, I am always curious to know what others experiences are in this realm. I find my stress and anxiety (and now, panic disorders?) sometimes make it hard to get up in the morning. Other days I feel great, enthusiastic even, and embrace what the world has in store for me. Hopefully a healthy regimen of working out, eating right, yoga and (if need be) therapy get me feeling better. Thank you for taking the time to read this post!

Lesson Learned

investing

On the evening of June 12th, 2022, I received an e-mail alert from the Celsius Network to the effect that withdrawals were being halted on account of ‘extreme market conditions.’ Which was true, the global cryptocurrency market was in the red, with practically all coins shedding 10% or more within a rapid 24 hours.

Fresh off of the downfall of Luna and TerraUSD, I initially thought that the move Celsius was doing (in freezing transactions) was genuinely in the best interest of its ‘community.’ Preventing a mass exodus of investments would give them time to stabilize their liquidity issues and protect the assets of the depositors (like myself).

In the last couple weeks, the company has been frustratingly silent about the current status of their operations and consequently, access to our funds. Many Tweets and news articles that have come out lately about the company all seem to suggest the company is moving towards bankruptcy filing – which, Alex Mashinsky (CEO of Celsius Network) and his company have given us little reason to think otherwise.

I had a generous amount of my families money invested with this company. I was drawn in by the impressive yield and a charismatic charlatan of a CEO. If you’ve read my previous post about the company, I (initially and foolishly) complimented the company for their ‘transparency.’

Only after being involuntarily locked out of access to my funds do I finally have some clarity as to how scammy this whole thing was. I trusted my families hard-earned money to a company solely based on reassurances of its salesman CEO; and what’s worse is I promoted it to others on this very blog. While I constantly caution my readers that I am not offering financial advice, and self-describe myself as an amateur investor at best; I falsely (and blindly) believed this company to be one of the good guys and truly saw it as a movement against the establishment.

It is through suffering that learning comes.

– Aeschylus

As of writing this post, nearly 3 weeks after the Celsius lock-out – I have come to terms with the real likelihood that I will never see those funds again. I am hoping for the best, but have mentally prepared myself for the worst. I have been a victim of a Ponzi scheme before; but this took me for significantly more money and left me feeling much more moronic then my past encounter. Rather than waste another minute more of anxiety or suffering on it, I am hoping this experience will teach me to be a better investor.

I am reminded of the news story about the young boy who committed suicide when the Robinhood trading app allowed him to over-leverage his investments and the kid accrued losses of over $730,000. (By the way – something a little eerie I just noticed was his suicide note was found by his parents on June 12th, 2020 – exactly two years to the day from my Celsuis email.) For me, especially as a father of two boys, this article was devastating to know that some child took their own precious life over financial problems.

Fortunately, first and foremost, I value how precious life is. Monetary loss, deep in debt, being broke – it sucks while you are in the thick of it, but everyone is capable of rebuilding and recovering from the worst financial situations. For me, that means learning the lesson of ‘if it seems too good to be true, it probably is.’

Honestly, I am not sure what my investing strategy looks like moving forward. I still continue to dollar-cost average into this tumultuous stock market. I most likely will shy away from crypto for a while. And probably get my real-estate exposure with REITs versus enrolling in more risky syndication deals. Really I just want to come out of this a lot wiser.

Hopefully none of you have had to endure being the victim of something like this, but feel free to share with me your story if you are so inclined! Thanks for taking the time to read this post!

Attending the AAPD 2022 Conference

Dentistry

Last week, I went down to San Diego, California to attend our American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) 2022 Annual Session. In order to be an actively practicing dentist in Nevada, I need at least 40 continuing education hours every 2 years; and these conferences usually knock a big chunk of those requirements out of the way. Not to mention, with the AAPD being a fairly large organization, the invited speakers and presented topics are high caliber.

In case you haven’t read some previous posts, I was president of our local chapter (the Nevada Academy of Pediatric Dentistry) for one year back in Jan 2020 to Jan 2021. In addition to informing our members of new COVID guidelines within their practices, dealing with state Medicaid cuts for dental reimbursement – I also worked with my executive committee to plan our annual business meeting and CE course. Mine was an extraordinary year; as an organization, we were implementing our very first online meeting. Finding sponsors proved to be difficult (many companies reported their own financial hardships), but our speakers were kind enough to donate their time to talk to our small group (plus we had no large venue to book) so fortunately we were not on the hook for the honorarium we have paid to our speakers in the past – so it was a bit of a wash for us in terms of our bank balance.

Anyways, the AAPD had also done virtual meetings for the past couple of years so certainly there was this universal consensus amongst attendees of how satisfying it was to be back to in-person meetings. You had not only pediatric dental professionals attending, but office staff members were invited, a bunch of children were present – I mean, it had the makings of a total super-spreader event. Let’s hope it wasn’t? I masked for all of 5 minutes. I got there and realized maybe about 1-2% of people were wearing one and I admit I got into a total ‘when in Rome’ kind of mindset.

If you don’t already know, I am an introvert and not particularly fond of crowds. When I arrived, and lots of people were standing together and socializing – and I didn’t see any familiar faces, I awkwardly stood alone at a table with continental breakfast wondering if I made the right choice to attend in the first place, and thought to myself anxiously whether the next four days would be like this very moment. I consider myself fairly affable, but I am not comfortable introducing myself or striking up conversations with strangers.

Fortunately, I eventually found my boss, some dental school friends, and even met some new people along the way. I spent time roaming the exhibit hall where many of the sponsors set up booths and promoted some of their products. I learned about dental procedures (e.g. tooth autotransplantation, molar substitution, etc.), attended some mini-clinic courses, and heard from M.D. physicians talking about mental health screenings on teenagers and adolescents.

Perhaps my favorite part of attending this year was listening to the keynote lecture by a guy named Ben Nemtin. He is an impressive young motivational speaker and is the author of a book titled “What Do You Want to Do Before You Die?”. His backstory discussed bouts of deep depression, but then went on to speak about how him and his friends started a journey to cross things off their bucket lists – resulting in more fulfilment in their lives by helping others, setting goals, and accomplishing their dreams.

Here are five things I took away from his speech:

  1. Write your bucket list – make it a project.
  2. Share your goals – make yourself accountable with others. “Fear is the taxes you pay to achieve your goal.”
  3. Be unstoppable – be persistent. Take as many “no’s” to get the “yes”.
  4. Moonshots – shoot for unrealistic goals.
  5. Give – happiness is only real when it is shared.

“Today is the oldest you’ve ever been, and the youngest you’ll ever be again.” 

Eleanor Roosevelt

In addition to the course, my family used this as an opportunity to turn our S.D. trip into a mini-vacation. We were able to hit up Legoland, had some fun at Belmont Park, went to the beach and saw Balboa park. All-in-all, I was very glad I attended this years annual conference!

Thank you so much for taking the time to visit this blog and read through this post!

The Terror of Terra

Uncategorized

This culture of ‘wokeness’ we’re all living in today is a fascinating one. Social media and hordes of people are getting together to drive companies to cancel celebrities (most notably Will Smith after his 2022 Oscar’s altercation with Chris Rock). Some issues, like the Supreme Court voting to overturn abortion rights, may not be so easy to influence. I know I personally favor companies that seem to have a moral compass. Headlines like “Costco’s iconic hot dog deal is still $1.50, despite record inflation rates raising prices everywhere else in the industry” just melt my heart – and I’m vegetarian and could care less about hot-dog prices. It is the principle of it, it gives you that warm fuzzy feeling that a big corporation is looking out for the common man. McDonald’s, Starbucks, and PepsiCo among many others promptly pledged to stop business operations in Russia after the invasion of Ukraine was ordered by Russian president Vladimir Putin.

This past week was particularly catastrophic in the crypto market. There was a collapse of Terra’s UST stablecoin and the native network token LUNA. I have talked briefly about stablecoin’s in the past here, but essentially these coins are supposed to minimize price volatility, offer a stable value, and many are supposed to be pegged to the US dollar. Several exist, including Tether (USDT), USDC (the one I use), Binance USD (BUSD), and many others. Terra created an ‘algorithmic stablecoin’ with UST that was supposed to hover closely around the $1 mark; but achieved this value using the other token in its ecosystem, LUNA.

The magic behind a system like this working has to do with a concept called ‘arbitrage’ trading. In the Terra ecosystem, a person could swap UST for a LUNA token (or vice versa) at a 1:1 ratio. The algorithm burns UST or mints LUNA to absorb volatility and balances the demand so that the overall price stays around its $1 level. This is in slight contrast to how USDC and USDT rely on a reserve of assets, fundamentally backed by state-issued fiat currency e.g. the U.S. dollar.

Stablecoins, to me at least, are seen as a shelter or a reasonably safe option in an otherwise frenzied crypto market. Algorithmic stablecoins do not technically have a solid collateral to back the price; in this case TerraUSD (UST) was using its governance token (LUNA) and minting and/or burning to help stabilize pricing. During major market stresses or shocks, in times like we have now where the Federal Reserve is substantially raising interest rates to combat record inflation, where stocks and bonds prices are falling together for the first time in decades, perhaps we shouldn’t be so surprised that a stablecoin becomes de-pegged.

The price of LUNA peaked close to $120 about a month ago, and is today worth fractions of a cent. I consider myself extremely fortunate that I was not invested in anything within the Terra ecosystem; but an event like this certainly does make me reconsider my risk tolerance in my crypto holdings – which currently sit at about 10% of my overall portfolio. Most of my crypto is in USDC gathering yield in the Celcius Network, with a bit of Bitcoin and Ethereum to add some excitement to the mix.

Speaking of the Celcius Network, I would say that my experience thus far has been wonderful with them. Granted, I have not attempted to withdraw any funds yet – especially in times of crisis (like with the recent rapid crash of LUNA and UST) – but I consistently collect interest (now, only available to accredited investors in the U.S.) every Monday like clockworks. Alex Mashinsky, the CEO of Celcius Network, came out within hours of this Terra catastrophe and spoke openly and transparently about how everyone (including himself) got pummeled, but this encounter may separate the ‘tourists’ from the true investors that believe in the decentralized finance (DeFi) movement. I think that makes for a good leader. Like Costco and the $1.50 hot-dog, I genuinely feel like Celcius has a mission to do good for the ‘common man’ (while of course, making millions of dollars for the corporation).

Everyone, none of this is meant to be financial advice. Truth be told, I have probably lost tons of money in my venture into the crypto space and especially in all this stock market, crypto crashing turmoil that has been happening lately. I recognize now more then ever that simple, straight-forward investing into low-cost, well-balanced index funds would’ve spared me the stress of all this volatility, would have saved me the high transfer fees, and provided me priceless peace of mind of just staying the course. I dodged a bullet this time with Terra; but suffered great declines in Netflix stock, SOFI, ARKK and many other hand-picked losers.

Thanks for taking the time to read my post. I was going to write about our recent family vacation, but this was the hot-topic of the week and my mind has been on our finances lately due to the craziness of the markets…so, there you have it. Good luck to you all, and please feel free to write me or post your own experiences!

Starting into Real Estate Syndications

investing

Life at the moment has been somewhat hectic. I am undergoing some PRP treatment for my hair loss, been busy scheduling and planning a family vacation, working on my 2021 tax returns, trying to exercise regularly while incorporating some dietary changes, and – last but not least – playing some tennis with my boys. Lots of content there for a blog post I suppose – I will write updates to many of these topics soon.

Today, though, I want to talk about investing in real estate syndications. As with every post I write; be it about investments, parenting, medical issues – please know it is not meant to be advisory in nature, and I always encourage seeking professional expertise and doing your own additional research where appropriate.

So, rather then reinvent the wheel, I would recommend you visit Investopedia’s Real Estate Investing guide for some of the fundamentals. It is a great overview, discusses a variety of real estate investing terms and options, and offers up some hard data on the historical pricing of this asset class.

If you are like me, and watched the fluctuations in the stock market these past several months; it gets unbelievably unnerving watching your account balance plummet so quickly. And while I feel investing in the market is a necessary evil, and (ultimately, over the long run) will bring in decent returns – diversifying a bit beyond Wall St. cannot hurt, right?

“But land is land, and it’s safer than the stocks and bonds of Wall Street swindlers”

Eugene O’neil

Just like my introduction to crypto and the Celcius Network started with a brief conversation with a friend, so too did my entrance into real estate investing. Several years ago (early 2019), a friend in Phoenix told me of a group of ladies (all professionals, one with a particularly successful family history in RE investing) that were looking to buy over 100 acre property in Arizona and needed investors.

At the time, the phrase “real estate syndication” was new to me, and little did I know that was what I was about to invest into. Essentially, a person or team (typically known as the sponsor or operator) identifies a property and/or project to purchase; and gathers a group of investors (a.k.a. limited partners) so to pool the capital together in order to buy real estate on a larger scale then we may individually have been able to do. This affords a small fry like me the ability to partake in partial ownership of shopping or strip malls, multi-family residential complexes, etc. without necessarily having any of the time demands or expertise needed to manage such projects. The sponsor I invest(ed) with has a niche of only buying vacant land in AZ with anticipation of future sales to a land developer for a significant profit. Again, the syndication is run by people that have expertise and insight that I do not possess, and are usually privy to off-the-market listings and can close on deals that would normally be too high dollar amount for me to afford alone.

When we started, some initial conference and Zoom calls were held among the syndicators and the investors to present the investment opportunity and to host a little Q&A. This was followed by an influx of paper work (i.e. subscription and operating agreements, confidential private placement memorandums, etc.) that needed to be signed. To be honest, much of the legal jargon in these documents go way over my head (and is scarily ironclad); but a big part of performing the due diligence on these investment opportunities is carefully evaluating these legal agreements – even if that means hiring a real estate attorney to review them. Within them are information such as management fees, distribution details, limitations on liquidity – content that is quite critical to weight the risks and benefits of entering into such an investment.

Another thing I learned along the way is that many syndication deals only take investments from “accredited investors“. Again, Investopedia to the rescue! I met a couple of the (income/net worth) requirements of becoming an accredited investor, had my CPA compose a letter stating as such – but basically it is a title given to those “who are deemed financially sophisticated enough to bear the risks.”

One of the general partners of the syndication stated that it would behoove me to set up a Limited Liability Company (LLC) in Arizona before I enter into this investment with them. What’s that? You don’t know what an LLC is? Investopedia has just what you need to learn more. I went to the Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) website and registered a Domestic LLC. Then, immediately followed that by going to the IRS website and submitting an application for an Employer Identification Number (EIN) so that I could create a business checking bank account to transfer funds through.

Once the business bank account was created and funded, the final step was sending off the cashier check. I have gone sky diving before, and the scariest moment was the point where you’re kneeled over the open doorway of the plane about to freefall into the unknown. I liken that rush of adrenaline to sitting at the bank tellers desk signing away our hard-earned money into a risky and new investing endeavor.

“If you can, you should, and if you’re brave enough to start, you will.”

Stephen King

Our families goal was to try and do at least one real estate investment every year. Last month (March of 2022) we closed on our fourth syndication deal – with this same group. Each one has gotten progressively smoother to complete, the repetition makes the process easier to understand. Truthfully though, I am slightly unsettled by the fact that we have “put all our eggs in one basket” – and though my friend vouched for this syndication group, we have yet to see any deals come to fruition (although in fairness, the managers have been quite honest about their long-term projected timeline for sale of each property).

In the past, I have come close to entering into deals with CityVest and DLP Capital Partners. Now that I am in this space, I pay attention to various crowd funding opportunities so much more readily. Believe it or not, Investopedia has a page devoted to just that.

My wife and I (along with a friend) recently purchased a condominium unit as a rental property – now we are even landlords. We also, quite regularly, invest in Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) with Vanguard. We currently have real estate as 12% of our overall investment portfolio and would love to see it grow to mid-twenties. Another goal is to get more cash flowing/passive income and tax benefits out of it. I will certainly keep you apprise of what we do next!

Since this post got quite lengthy, I’ll commit to writing more about those ventures in a future post.

Believe it or not, I have no financial interest in Investopedia or any other site referenced above. Investopedia just has lots of great info on it, so much to learn from. Thank you very much for taking the time to read this post, and I am always curious to know about ways in which people diversify their own investment portfolios. Please let me know what you do! Have a wonderful day!

Weather the Storm

investing, Lifestyle

If this blog affords me anything, it is the opportunity to write about the things that occupy my attention. Day after day, since 2022 started, I wearily watch as the stock market plummets and any profits and gains from the last several years get wiped out within a matter of months. Like the gray, rainy weather in Seattle that leads some to experience seasonal affective disorder (SAD); so to can the chronic red and sharp declines in the stock market lead to gloom and mental anguish.

By definition, a correction is a market decline that is more than 10%, but less than 20% off of a recent market high. A bear market is usually defined as a decline of 20% or greater. The S&P 500 index is the overall representation of the market’s performance. There are plenty of other terms (i.e. market dip, crash, etc.) that are pertinent but could just as easily be Investopedia‘d.

Again, graphs like the one above present the performance of the overall S&P 500 Index. If you are like me, and your portfolio is a composite of index funds, stocks and bonds, and other asset classes – you may fare significantly better, catastrophically worse, or somewhere in-between.

Individual stocks are prone to much more volatility. A character on an HBO show rides his Peloton, suffers a heart-attack and dies – causing the stock to sink nearly 12% the next trading day. A large group of traders on the r/WallStreetBets Reddit forum helped drive GameStop’s stock surging up over 400% once upon a time. A misinterpreted tweet by Elon Musk stating to ‘use Signal’ confused investors and sent the wrong stock up soaring over 6300%.

More recently it is the Ukraine and Russia conflict and the question of an impending war? The Federal Reserve and possibility of several interest rate hikes? Certainly economy-related concerns but also lots of other miscellaneous events and outside influences can spook investors and cause the fear that lead to sharp market declines and panic selling.

Probably a totally irrational skepticism on my part – but I think the news media has manipulation tactics and selectively seeds content, stock analysts have their own obvious biases and agenda, and of course corrupt politicians have access to insider information that allow them the ability to execute privileged and personally advantageous trades. It is hard to find trustworthy sources to believe. Just my opinion.

In a past blog, I briefly introduced a bit about my investing approach. Certainly trying times like these test our conviction. Lots of different investment philosophies exist – each with their own strengths and weaknesses. I subscribe to a philosophy known as Dollar-Cost Averaging (DCA). You can read about it a bit more here, but essentially you put same amount of money in the same stock (or index fund, etc.) on a regular basis over time, regardless of the share price.

“Our favorite holding period is forever.”
– Warren Buffett

In terms of personal investing, the February-March 2020 bear market was the only one I have actually had to endure. Before that, I was dirt broke and too busy suffering through dental school and multiple residency programs. Even though I know many others are experiencing these same tribulations right now, there is a unexplainable loneliness and depression that sets in when you see these steep market declines. I used Vanguard’s financial advisor services for a short while, and while I ultimately decided to stop and take things into my own hands, I did appreciate that I was not constantly worrying about how the markets were doing.

I dare not try and predict where the bottom of this latest market crash will be. However, I find some solace in knowing, if we stay the course and weather this storm, the market will do what it historically has – deliver some dependable returns.

In a future post, I will go over a few other investment strategies I do to minimize risk, including: invest in syndication real estate deals, invest in REITs and rental properties, and more recently – dare I say it – cryptocurrencies. Diversification is the name of the game!?

As always, thank you for taking the time to read through this post. Hope that some of this information can be useful to you, and please feel free to share in your own experiences!

The Tennis Takeover

Lifestyle

About a year before the world knew of COVID-19, my wife and I enrolled our two young boys in a local community tennis program. They had briefly tried their hands (or feet, rather) at soccer before that; but their scrawny physiques could not handle the endurance needed to continuously run the length of the soccer field. As their enthusiasm in soccer seemed to wane a bit, we made the decision to give something else a try.

Introducing tennis to them during COVID-19 was quite a blessing. It was naturally socially-distanced, much less of a contact sport then soccer was, and it was just enough of an outdoor social activity in a time when home-schooling was mandated and kids really stopped seeing their friends regularly.

The city’s park and recreation tennis class we had them in was short lived. The teacher was an older gentleman that showed up late, used most of the class time to ask the kids what they ate for lunch, and spent a disproportionately little amount of time letting them hold a racquet, instructing them about the rules and scoring of the game, and teaching them proper form.

It did however, allow us to be out on tennis courts. And that was huge. Because just being outdoors gave us an opportunity to see other coaches on neighboring courts teaching young kids. Now, most of the tennis greats of the world were holding racquets and started playing the game by ages 3 or 4. My kids were about 10 and 6. Oops. Oh well, better late then never?

“Do not squander time, for that’s the stuff life is made of.”

Benjamin Franklin

As I saw coaches that I thought had impressive teaching styles, I would approach them and inquire about lessons for my own kids. At one point, my boys had lessons from three different instructors and were spending about 1 to 2 hours out on the courts every day of the week. One day, my oldest son told me that the way one coach wanted him to serve was a different technique then another coach; and asked me who he should listen to?

At first, I thought I was doing them a favor recruiting all these accomplished trainers. One coach had almost gone pro himself. Another taught university level men’s tennis. Still another had such infectious passion for the game; and not only taught form and technique but focused on and spoke to the mental acuity and emotional stability needed to really succeed at it.

As it turns out, the coach that once told me “it’s not good to have too many voices in their heads” is the last one standing. He hosts a clinic a couple times a week, and offers private lessons on weekends that we sometimes take advantage of. He’s the right amount of strict/stern, pushes the boys to advance their game, encourages them to always be ready, to strategize the placement of their shots, and has really done well to teach them the intricacies of the game.

My wife and I went on to the U.S. Tennis Associations (USTA.com) website late last year and inquired about tennis tournaments our boys could participate in. Since then, they’ve played in several and have faired better in some then others. Our oldest son, Ishaan (12 yo), is mentally confident going into matches and just has a tendency of making unforced errors. Our youngest, Krish (8 yo), has an impressive passion and skill, but struggles a bit with nerves and believing in his abilities.

Part of the reason we wanted them to enter tournaments is to desensitize them to being in competitions. It is one thing to leisurely play against your sibling, against kids in your class, etc.; but it is a totally different dynamic when you are in a match against a stranger, you are officially keeping score, and there are rankings and trophies on the line.

We want them to learn responsibility; to eat a good healthy breakfast, get a good night sleep, and to get their tennis bag ready the night before a competition. We want to have them figure out how to cope with losses, and learn from mistakes they make within their matches. We try to reward them, win or lose, by letting them decide what they want for dinner or picking the dessert of their choice.

Tennis has, in many ways, taken over our lives. I absolutely love that my kids ask if we can go play tennis at the park on the days when they do not have lessons with their coach (and even some days when they do). I love that they want to watch tennis highlights of Nadal and Djokovic and Federer playing. I love that they now coach and correct me on how to properly grip a backhand or toss my serve.

Honestly, it has been an expensive hobby. Tennis shoes and attire, racquets (not to mention restringing) and balls, lesson (both clinic and private) – it adds up very quickly. I can only hope this is a lifelong passion of theirs, and that they go on and teach their own children to love and be good at the game.

The truth is, I secretly want them to be champions of this sport. I want them to progress, work hard, and potentially turn this into something professional if they can. But if they lose interest, want to explore other passions, that is okay too. I do not ever want to be the parent that forces their child to fulfill my own desire for stardom and success.

Thank you for taking the time to read this post! And spending time on my blog. As with so many topics that I discuss (investing, dentistry, medical issues, etc.), this will likely be the first of many posts about this matter. If you have any questions, or suggestions, I would love to hear from you! Be well!

Interest in the Celsius Network

investing

UPDATE: On July 13, 2022, Celsius and several of its affiliates commenced voluntary Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings. See my latest post on the matter at Lesson Learned.

I was never great at staying on track with new year’s resolutions. Sure, we all start out ambitious enough – try and exercise more, eat healthier, take up a new hobby, etc. – but my goals usually start to obscure within a few weeks from their nascence. Perhaps therein lies the problem – I need to be better about being goal oriented. I have read we should write goals down, being specific and keeping things measurable and attainable. For example, my goal is to write at least two blog posts a month this year. Okay 2022, let’s go!

In today’s post, I wanted to introduce a new investment vehicle I started to use last month. However, before I go any further, as always – I am but a mere amateur investor and rookie blogger, everything I suggest should be investigated further and probably presented to a financial professional.

At an ugly sweater Christmas party last month, I struck up a conversation with a friend about investing. As an introvert, I do not always like attending these events. Predominantly, however, I find I not only thoroughly end up enjoying myself but also learning quite a bit of useful information from other people’s ideas and experiences. As was the case here.

Now, terms like cryptocurrency, blockchain technology, non-fungible tokens (NFTs) – some of it still confuses and frankly scares me a little. Nonetheless, it does appear that it is here to stay. Therefore, (and perhaps another potential 2022 goal?) I have vowed to keep an open mind to it and slowly incorporate it into my overall investment portfolio.

Where was I? Oh yeah, at the social event I so courageously attended last Christmas, my friend turned me on to a company (and app) called Celsius. The hook for me was that he had been receiving a steady 10-12% interest on his money, WEEKLY! According to Bankrate.com, the national average interest rate on savings accounts as of last week was 0.06 percent. Another recent interesting statistic, consumer prices jumped 7% in 2021. When our savings do not grow at or above the same rate as inflation, essentially we are losing money because our purchasing power diminishes as time goes on.

Even though Celcius’s motto is to “unbank yourself” from the traditional financial systems, their service is basically a bank for digital currency. The Celcius Network is a platform that offers interest-bearing savings accounts and loan borrowing at remarkably low rates. No withdrawl, transfer, transaction, origination nor termination fees (for their services). They tout a mission statement that aims to act in the best interest of the community; in large part by giving back 80% of revenue to customers in the form of interest.

In exchange for storing your cryptocurrency funds within the Celcius wallet (which the company in turn loans out retail and institutional borrows), every week you receive an interest payment into your account. You can choose to receive payments in like-kind or in CEL (Celcius’s native tokens – an option only available to accredited investors if you live within the U.S.).

A particular class of cryptocurrency, referred to as stablecoins, is a non-volatile and price-stable asset. Essentially, with Bitcoin and Ethereum, the level of volatility may be thrilling for some investors but it hinders its benefit as a medium of exchange for many businesses. At least with stablecoins, the stable value means the coin can always be redeemed for an equivalent currency amount at any time.

After the Xmas party, per my friends instructions, I went home and downloaded Coinbase, CoinbasePro and the Celcius app. I created accounts for each, set up all the two-factor verification security stuff, and set up the payment method within Coinbase to acquire funds from my checking account. Within Coinbase, I “traded” (i.e. purchased) a certain dollar amount of USD Coin (USDC) stablecoin. Unfortunately, while the coins may be added to your Coinbase wallet immediately, they are unable to be transferred out for short while after. Eventually you will receive an email from Coinbase stating

The $xxx.xx buy you made on (e.g.) January 01, 2022 is now available to withdraw or send. Please login to view your total available balance.

After the funds are available to be traded out (usually about a week after the initial trade took place), I opened up CoinbasePro, navigated to Portfolio, and under Wallets would locate the Deposit option. Fortunately, there are no fee’s to transfer from Coinbase to CoinbasePro. From what I was told, a CoinbasePro transfer to Celcius take less of a fee than transfers from Coinbase directly. Also, Celcius lets you purchase USDC directly within the Celcius app but the fees (standard credit card processing fees, bank transfer fees) are higher still then if you are using Coinbase and CoinbasePro. Fees vary based on the amounts being transferred. After the funds are in your CoinbasePro account, you are immediately able to get them into Celcius. Within the Celcius app, you follow the Receive Coins link and (very importantly) make sure to choose the right asset from the drop-down.

Celcius will then alert you that the address is meant to receive only that specific token or digital asset, and anything else being sent over may result in permanent loss of funds. BE CAREFUL HERE!

I hit Copy on the address they provide (making a mental note of the last 3 or 4 digits of the long alphanumeric address), go back into CoinbasePro and then choose the Withdraw option under the Portfolio tab. I select USDC (or whatever asset you choose to trade with), and then select the Crypto Address option. I make ABSOLUTELY CERTAIN that when I paste the address, the last 4 digits matches the one Celcius Network gave me.

Here is the point you will encounter Network Fees, and the amount you send will have to account for those fees being available to be withdrawn.

On some final notes here, as with any investments, there is a possibility of loss of funds. Celcius Network is very established, is reviewed highly, and has an ever-growing following of Celcian users. However, they do not provide any insurance on our deposits, so if the company falls victim to a hack for instance, we may be screwed. Also, the Celcius interest rates vary weekly as well as from coin to coin. When my friend at the party started with them, it was 10-12%; I have consistently been getting 8.50% – which, in today’s market, is still nothing to sneeze at.

Lastly, the CEO – Alex Mashinsky – hosts a weekly broadcast called AMA – “Ask Mashinsky Anything.” I have tuned in to a few of these now, and have been loving the philosophy and transparency of the company, the leadership and support staff appear genuinely happy to work for company, and I get the sense they really do have a solid sense of community well-being.

Again, I am not a professional that you should be seeking any sort of financial advice from and cannot be held accountable if your cryptocurrency get lost in the blockchain metaverse. Please seek independent financial advice before dealing with digital assets. Within my own portfolio, Celcius Network is just another means to diversify a bit.

Thank you for reading this post! If I can help in anyway, with the understanding that I am a newb myself, I am most certainly happy to do so! Also, full disclosure, if you click on (and ultimately sign up for) the Celcius Network hyperlink I provided above (or use Referral ID 173697cff1) – we each receive their promotional reward. I have no other financial disclosures to report. Have a great day!

Sciatica Sucks

Lifestyle

I find it incredible just how much we take for granted the elemental things within our lives. When I was in my early 20’s, I had a glob of wax obstruct my ear canal for a while. My sense of hearing was diminished, until I eventually got in to see an ENT; who, quite painfully, unclogged that cruddy cerumen. I remember tearing up in the last few seconds of him teasing out what looked like a nasty, slimy brown ball of goop about the size of my pinky finger tip. My point being, losing my hearing (out of one ear) for a short while made me realize how even the most rudimentary facilities we are given in life are not always fully appreciated until we are bereft of them. Thus goes everything in life I suppose. Don’t know what you got till it’s gone.

I probably spent a few days on cloud nine elated by my newly restored sense of hearing; and then sadly lost that appreciativeness and exhilaration to carrying on with the daily grind. However, today, I did not want to talk again about gratitude, but rather, yet another health problem that has recently affected me.

One pastime I enjoy most in life is receiving massages. However, a month ago after having received one – from a massage therapist I have visited several times before – I noticed a day or two later that sitting (and then standing) was tender in my right gluteal region. At first it was relatively mild, similar to muscle soreness we might experience after a solid workout. As days passed, that soreness was no longer isolated to just my gluts but started to radiate and extend down my right leg into the calf region. The severity of the pain also increased substantially, as did the frequency of when it was occurring. Tasks like sitting on the toilet and driving to work had me tearing up.

Sciatica is a nerve pain which originates in the lower back and radiates from deep in the buttocks and can travel down the lower leg. Usually sciatic nerve pain is unilateral and will only be symptomatic on one side of the body. There are several known causes, but a herniated (or “bulging”) disc in the lumbar (lower) spine is typically the most common. As a result, the nerve becomes compressed and there is pain (sharp, burning, radiating), inflammation and often times numbness/muscle weakness associated with it.

My commute to work each morning is only about 15 to 18 minutes; and I kid you not, I almost had to pull over multiple times to just stand up and stretch. Sitting for even short periods of time became excruciating. Fortunately mine was only an intermittent and postural pain; others unfortunately may experience it on a more constant basis. I had everything from a light tingling sensation, to pins-and-needles, to a strong, sharp burning and numb atrophy feeling in my calf muscle.

By the time I would arrive to work, daily, I would be popping 800 mg of Ibuprofen. That would get me through most of my day. At home, I would apply a heat pack and do some stretches. I also made one visit to a chiropractor and had some spinal manipulation and adjustment techniques performed.

“That which does not kill us, makes us stronger.” 
— Friedrich Nietzsche

According to SPINE-health.com, this affects 10-40% of the population, typically around the age of 40 years. Also, certain types of occupations (perhaps dentistry?) who often bend their spine forward or sideways or raise their arms frequently (okay, definitely dentistry!) may be higher risk. Thankfully, most cases typically get better with nonsurgical treatments within about 4 to 6 weeks. Some have persistent (over 1 year), and even progressive symptoms, in which case sometimes surgical intervention may be indicated.

As I write this, I am relieved to say my sciatic nerve pain is the best it has felt in over a month. It exists still, but not at an unbearable level like a month ago. Time, medication, proper stretches, heat therapy and the hands of a good chiropractor seem to have helped me make nearly a full recovery. Who knew something so simple like a drive to work or sitting on the toilet could be so painfully agonizing. Sciatica sucks!

Okay, so I have some PTSD about getting massages now. That is a blog post in and of itself. If you are just starting to have sciatic nerve pain, I am happy to share with you some of the Youtube videos and bookmarked websites I have on stretches that were effective with managing my pain. Please feel free to contact me directly or leave comments below! Thank you for taking the time to read this post, I appreciate it!